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Andrew

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My friend Tim and I headed down to the Chilcotin and arrived late in the afternoon. It was over four hours of driving, 2 of which were on dirt roads. We camped next to Tim's truck and headed out the next morning. Day one was a lot of climbing to get up out of the Fraser River Valley and onto the Chilcotin Plateau. The temps in the daytime were around 20 celcius (68 f). A lot colder at night. 5 to 10 c. 

The first 2 pics are crossing the Fraser River just before stopping for the night.
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Looking south, down river.
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The tents next to the truck.
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Here we are the next morning, ready to set out. Our destination, the top of that hill behind us. The Fraser River is at the base just out of sight.

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Andrew

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There was a small climb and then a descent to get back to the bridge. Just a km or 2.
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This is on the east side of the bridge. Getting ready for a couple of hours of climbing.
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We were being watched by these marmots. They can grow to be 20 pounds. That's sagebrush behind them. What an amazing smelling plant.
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Andrew

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Tim doing what he likes to do. Climb.
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Snake! Only the third time I've ever seen a snake in the wild.
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The snake didn't move at all. Relying on camouflage I guess.
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Andrew

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A lady in a truck stopped to chat while we were eating lunch on the roadside. She told us we could probably get water at the school in the small native community of Canoe Creek. It was less than an hours ride away. When we arrived a man named Hector who lives next to the school let us in to fill our bottles with water and gave us 2 cups of coffee each and then filled my flask with coffee for the road. We had a great chat for almost a half hour.

The next 2 pics were taken just after Canoe Creek. 

Cooling off in a tiny creek. The water wasn't safe to drink with out sterilizing due to the bazillion cows in the area. Our bottles were full anyways.
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Andrew

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We stopped to camp in this roadside gravel pit for the night. 40 km completed. Springtime here is wood tick season, so we avoided grass and trees when possible. This is Tim showing off his Park Tools spork. I hate sporks. "Look, it even has a part number!",he would say.
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  Throughout the night we could hear tiny little rock slides coming down the hillside. 
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Andrew

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We get up onto the plateau and what do we see, horses. Pretty sure these are wild. No brands or shoes. Some of them were quite shaggy looking. There also didn't seem to be any fences or ranches up here.
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Andrew

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Next we headed north on the Meadow Lake road. This was the beginning of another long climb. Not too steep but pretty long.
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Andrew

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The road leveled out and we were making great time. I hit 63 km per hour on a downhill section! I was faster on the downhills because of my fat tires, but Tim killed me on all of the climbs. We were just about out of water, so we were super happy to come across this creek around noon. The cage is to keep the beavers from damming the culvert.
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Coffee and lunch time! We had a nice long break.

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That's horse poo on the road.
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Andrew

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Stopping for water later in the afternoon by an old ranch. A couple of buildings seemed to be still in use.
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Andrew

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Following Dog Creek looking for an old rec site. Those are dead burned trees in the background. An older native gentleman stopped to chat and told us about the fire here a couple of years ago. It took so long for the fire crews to get here, the locals were up there battling it themselves at night with out any proper fire gear. They were digging and cutting fire breaks. Hardcore. The crews wanted to wait until morning.
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Dog Creek and Brigham creek converge at this rec site. We arrived about 4 pm after riding another 40 km. Lots of time to eat and relax.
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Andrew

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Still following Dog Creek to get to the town of Dog Creek, another small native community. We were looking forward to the descent and the upcoming store. The rec site is at the beginning of a long valley in the plateau that we'll be heading west in, untill Dog Creek which is almost down to the Fraser River. 
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Andrew

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When we reached the store we purchased chips and tinned fruit and sat at a picnic table outside. Tim got a cuple of cups of coffee and I had a Mountain Dew. The first I've had in many years. I enjoyed it immensely.

This is a sign as we were leaving Dog Creek and almost at the climb from hell. After Dog Creek we get to climb back out of the valley up onto the plateau again.
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This climb nearly killed me. I rode it for about five minutes and could do no more. It took me almost 45 minutes to walk up it. It was steep, twisty and hot, and I could never see very far ahead. It felt like it was never going to end. I basically walked for fifty paces and then took a 1 minute break. Tim rode the whole thing with a smile of course.
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I'm pretty sure I gave Tim the finger after he took this picture.
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Andrew

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At the top of the climb. That's the Fraser River Valley in the background. Most of the land on the other side belongs to the Gang Ranch, which was built in the 1860's to supply Barkerville with beef. Barkerville was the main gold rush town in BC, and the main reason for the settling of this province. They actually did a couple of cattle drives from the U.S. to Barkerville before the ranch was built. The longest drives in the world. Took 2 years to get here. The whole town of Barkerville has been restored and reconstructed into a living history museum. You pay to get in. It's awesome and I work there every summer as the blacksmith.
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Andrew

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Here's a couple of pictures of Barkerville. First one is in the 1860's and the second is the 1930's or 40's. It became a park in 1958.
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Barkerville 1.jpg 

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Andrew

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More wild horses. These are a few of Tim's pictures and are pretty awesome.
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