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 Should Pondero have all the fun?
 Yes, definitely! 0 0%
 Nope. 4 100%
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adventurepdx

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Reply with quote  #1 
Because we can't let Pondero have all the fun! [wink]

It was clear on Wednesday January 20th, so I did a ramble up to Smith Lake. Not only did I make coffee, but soup as well!

The whole thing documented here: https://urbanadventureleague.wordpress.com/2016/01/21/a-wednesday-ramble-20-january-2016/




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spchristen

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Reply with quote  #2 
Nice!!  Thanks for the post.  It is very inspiring to see other's adventures!!  I also like seeing the coffee kit people use.  Glad you got a clear day to enjoy.
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Pondero

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Reply with quote  #3 
No, Pondero, should not have all the fun. One of the big reasons so many of my blog posts involve coffee outside is my desire to share something that I have found to be so enjoyable.  I'm inspired by the soup addition.  I'm going to give serious consideration to an outing in the near future that involves cooking a simple breakfast or lunch.
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GritsnGravel

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Reply with quote  #4 
How do you fit all this stuff into your saddle bag!? I just want to get a burner and small fuel kit to boil water and pour into a french press for camping this summer. Can you make any recommendations?

I'm planning to rando the last 2 days (2 nights) of RAGBRAI (+1 day home). I'm trying to pack as light as possible. Should be able to fit the hammock, fly, etc up front in my handlebar harness, put electronics in my Osprey pack, snacks in my handlebar bag, tools and spare parts in my framepack, some clothes and camp shoes in my Swift Zeitgeist saddle bag. Hope I can squeeze coffee in someplace too.

I guess if I have to, I can keep my rack and strap on panniers, but if I do that I might be tempted to carry a lot more and instead of eating out, just bring all my meals. But I don't think I want to so that much planning and logistics! Any advice at that too?
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graveldoc

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Reply with quote  #5 
I'll chime in.  There are a number of ways to assemble a suitable outfit for boiling water for French press coffee.  Some of it depends on fuel choice.  Many of us use an alcohol burning stove such as a Trangia.  The stove can be put inside a small pot (such as the GSI aluminum pot) but the fuel will need to be stored in a small plastic bottle; usually 3-4 oz.  Plan on using about an ounce or so to boil 750-1000 ml. of water. Also, you'll need a windscreen made of heavy duty aluminum foil to increase stove efficiency.   Another option is the Esbit stove.  They make a neat little kit which includes the pot and burner/windscreen base. The fuel is a solid fuel that has a peculiar odor and leaves some residue on the pot.  The windscreen and fuel can be store inside the pot.  REI and Campmor websites show a number of options for you to peruse.  For me, part of the fun is in trying different combinations. 
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adventurepdx

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Reply with quote  #6 
Quote:
Originally Posted by GritsnGravel
How do you fit all this stuff into your saddle bag!?


The Carradice Camper Longflap is known to swallow entire universes! [biggrin]

But like graveldoc says, you can do coffee prep with not a lot. You'll need to have:
  1. A way to boil water
  2. A way to brew coffee
  3. Fuel and a way to hold it
For this outing, I used my big Trangia (27) kit. But the smaller Trangia Backpacker 28 is fully adequate. Goes for about $35 here: http://www.campsaver.com/minitrangia-28-t-stove-kit




And that coffee filter above is a Soto Helix for around $20. http://www.campsaver.com/soto-helix-coffee-maker

You can go simpler/cheaper, but this is a very useful all-around set.



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Pondero

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Reply with quote  #7 
So far I have not pursued the minimalist approach to coffee gear. I routinely bring a small hand grinder, and sometimes even the Bialetti Moka Pot. But I have thought about assembling a more minimalist kit. If so, I'd probably be thinking in terms of a homemade alcohol stove, minimal windscreen, a pot no larger than necessary for one mug of brewed coffee, and the Helix. I'd also think about how to make these items fit together for storage/transport to take up minimal space. Maybe my mug is handle-less. Perhaps this would be an entertaining puzzle to solve.

So far, I've been able to fortify myself with sufficient luggage to bring along more stuff (including what has been affectionately named the lollygagging mat) on my brew up outings.

If you have a preference for French press brewing, it might be worthwhile to forego the Helix, and the other suggestions from the guys sound helpful for reducing kit size in the areas for which compromise is acceptable.

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Spencer

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Reply with quote  #8 
This whole coffee outside thing fascinates me...so far coffee outside for Spence involves being on the bike for like too long, finding a gas station, sitting on curb an sipping 3 hour old nasty, burnt, swill while folks try not to make eye contact with the oddly dressed man. [smile]


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GritsnGravel

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Reply with quote  #9 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Spencer
This whole coffee outside thing fascinates me...so far coffee outside for Spence involves being on the bike for like too long, finding a gas station, sitting on curb an sipping 3 hour old nasty, burnt, swill while folks try not to make eye contact with the oddly dressed man. [smile]



Well, can't say I haven't been there before! lol

Thanks Pondero, Shawn, for the insight to your brew kits. I've seen how you roll Pondero! Everything but the kitchen sink! ha! I could dig that too, but the kit I'd like to assemble for this short tour I'd like to closely resemble my kit for TI if I am able to get a spot next spring (2017). So I think I'm going to try to pare it down as much as possible. 

I'll let you guys know what pans out for me and post my first coffee outdoors adventure in the upcoming months (weeks? currently 22 degrees out.....we'll see and hope for an early spring). 
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adventurepdx

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Reply with quote  #10 
Quote:
Originally Posted by GritsnGravel
Thanks Pondero, Shawn, for the insight to your brew kits. I've seen how you roll Pondero! Everything but the kitchen sink! ha! I could dig that too, but the kit I'd like to assemble for this short tour I'd like to closely resemble my kit for TI if I am able to get a spot next spring (2017). So I think I'm going to try to pare it down as much as possible.


Just to note, I don't always carry "everything but the kitchen sink", though the Leisure Consultant always does. [biggrin] I've got a few different setups, depending on situation and mood.

For instance, when I'm just doing a quick coffee or tea outside and that's all I'm doing, I often grab the Esbit integrated stove/pot unit. Esbit uses solid fuel, so grabbing a couple tabs plus a way to make coffee, like the Soto Helix pourover, means I'm all set.

It's available here: http://www.rei.com/product/852113/esbit-solid-fuel-stove-and-cookset

But for all around versatility in a camp stove setup that is also small, you really can't beat the Trangia 28 Backpacker unit. It's small, weighs under a pound, has a pot and frying pan, and all stows into the pot/pan unit. That frying pan is critical, as pretty much no backpacking stove/cookware unit comes with one. And if you want to move beyond the simply boiling water to rehydrate instant dinners (bleh) or heat up a can o' soup, a frying pan is very useful! Just make sure Pondero scrambles those eggs well! [wink]


So if you want something for your upcoming tour, I'd highly recommend the Trangia 28. Now I just have to figure out what this "TI" is. Texas Instruments? [rofl]


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adventurepdx

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Reply with quote  #11 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Spencer
This whole coffee outside thing fascinates me...so far coffee outside for Spence involves being on the bike for like too long, finding a gas station, sitting on curb an sipping 3 hour old nasty, burnt, swill while folks try not to make eye contact with the oddly dressed man. [smile]


Oh, I often stop for coffee on my rides too, and here in Portland, it's usually a step up from convenience store swill. [biggrin] Though no Dunkin' Donuts here. [frown]

But one thing ya gotta remember about Pondero is he rides in a landscape where gas stations/convenience stores are few and far between. So his options are either make a big thermos beforehand, or do it on the road. Heck, where Pondero goes, there's probably more of a chance of running into moosemoose than a place to buy coffee! [wink]

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