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xcaferacer

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Reply with quote  #1 
This bike was finished in time for a nice 4th of July morning ride. I bought the bike, stripped it down to the bare metal frameset, and did the rattle-can Rust-Oleum paint job. Then I put the rest of it together and came up with this:





It has a `98 Sturmey-Archer AW hub that turns rather stiffly. And this is the model without the oil port. Anybody know how I can loosen this thing up?


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tallbikeman

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Reply with quote  #2 
Xcafe what a great looking British paint job British built bicycle.  Your fender color choice came out great.  Your conversion is delightful. Concerning the hub stiffness, the bearings on your hub are adjustable from both sides as I remember.  Try readjusting your cones a bit.  The Sheldon Brown website has good instructions on how to handle the cones properly.  If you pull your cones off, the non drive side part of the hub should have flats or spanner holes so the hub non driver side can be unscrewed from the hub body and all the guts will fall out.  If you do car repair you won't have much trouble cleaning and greasing the interior of a three speed hub.  Generally three speeds don't have to be timed.  I could find no mention of timing marks on the Sheldon Brown website reassemble instructions.  I do 3 speed internal maintenance so rarely that it will take several tries before I get it back together in a proper working condition.  I presently own a modern AW with a drum brake.  No oiler on my new AW either.  Sheldon Brown's site recommends Phil's tenacious oil for oil bikes but I'm not sure what grease to use on a non oiler.  It is possible to drill a hole in the hub, thread it and put in a oil port.  That modification might not be appropriate for all models of newer AW. The newer AW hubs need a special spanner wrench to get them apart.  Did this frame have a British Thread bottom bracket?  Good luck with your AW adjustments.
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xcaferacer

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Reply with quote  #3 
I forgot to mention this, but the fenders are actually compound-curve bamboo from Woody's Fenders in Bend, OR.

And I figured out the cones myself on Saturday night. It's spinning more freely now, but I still think I'm going to do an overhaul on it. Something is still not quite right...

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lugdoug

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Reply with quote  #4 
Love the look of this bicycle. It's hard to tell it's a rattle can paint job. The black rims with black sidewalls look nice too! Well done conversion.
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xcaferacer

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Reply with quote  #5 
Problem Solved... For Now

It wasn't the hub, it was the slick chrome dropouts. After I loosened the cones the wheel spun freely in the workstand. But when I went for a ride the axle was sliding backwards on the non-drive side. (I'm holding tension on the drive-side with a Surly Hurdy-Gurdy.) - and the wheel was rubbing on the brake shoe. I didn't discover it until it got so bad that it rubbed the paint off the chainstay on the left hand side.



So the first thing I tried was a new A-R washer from Harris. But when I tried to tighten it enough to prevent slippage, the washer cracked and fell apart. I've had this happen before on another 3-speed. So I replaced that with a single-sided A-R washer, tab towards the front, and stuck in a little plastic spacer doodad from the rear dropout of a Peugeot Versailles that isn't currently ridden.



That solves the problem for now. But when the chain wears and I need to tighten the drive-side a bit, I will have to find some other way to maintain alignment. I'm thinking about roughing up the chrome and A-R nut with a file, but that's a pretty drastic solution which could lead to corrosion of the dropout. The answer, I think, lies in having a set of spacers for future adjustments.

What a PITA, huh? Any other ideas?



.

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tallbikeman

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Reply with quote  #6 
Xcaferacer I have owned several bicycles with chrome dropouts.  Several were equipped with quick release dropouts and I never had a problem.  I've used hard ridged washers in the past to keep the drive side from being pulled forward.  Generally chrome is very hard but maybe a star washer would work.  I found something called the DMR Chain Tugs chain tensioner at: https://www.worldwidecyclery.com/products/dmr-chain-tugs-chain-tensioner-10mm-pair?gclid=CjwKCAjwyrvaBRACEiwAcyuzRDrLxAeKjhs0v-p4BlHzGyr9-wef9cfYEqgWWNcWdU8A1gZcL-8_7xoCHMEQAvD_BwE   The three speed hubs are usually 11mm so maybe drill this out a little.  These type of chain tensioners are pretty bulletproof.  I've had bicycles with this type of chain tensioner and setting chain tension is a breeze and I never had one slip.  You could shorten your cranks to say 145mm and that would cut down on the torque you are applying to the rear end.  I've heard that Tour de France racers often run short cranks for high rpm, high power.  Good luck with your problem.
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tallbikeman

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Reply with quote  #7 
Xcaferacer, After finally reading all the text of your post I realized you had already solved the drive side issue.  I've not heard of the non drive side moving before.  Have you installed the anti rotation washer properly?  I've had axles turn when the anti rotation washer failed or was installed wrong.  Did your bicycle ever have the axle positioning bolts that came through the dropout and bore right on the axle itself.  Lots of bicycles in the old days had them.  Properly adjusted that would keep the axle from traveling backwards in the dropout slot.  I'm stumped at this time as to what is causing your problem.  I tend to think the axle washer may be the problem.  If you rebuild the hub I'd like to hear if there was any problem in it.  Good luck with this issue.
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xcaferacer

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Reply with quote  #8 
Thanks for the advice, tallbikeman.

Here's how I solved it: I used the single-sided A-R washers, 2 on each axle - one on the outside of the dropout pointing forward, and the other on the inside pointing aft. The Surly Hurdy-Gurdy tensioner allows this for reasons that would be better explained with photos, which I'll post as soon as I have time to take them.

Yesterday I swapped out the balky AW wheelset for the SRF-5(w) wheelset from my Raysport. I am going to convert that back to a derailleur drivetrain, using late `80s Deore. But right now it is Riding Season, not wrenching season, so I'll dig into the AW after the snow flies. 

I rode the Super Course to work this morning with no slippage at all. The 5-speed worked perfectly. The only thing I don't like about it is that the wheelset is now polished alloy, not that cool looking black. The bike is still beautiful, but it has lost that unique contrast that made it stand out.

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